Archive for the ‘Advertising’ Category

New shopping chain opens in Pyongyang

Monday, January 19th, 2015

The Choson Sinbo announced the opening of the Hwanggumbol Shop (황금벌상점) in Pyongyang last December. According to the pro-DPRK outlet, it is open from 6am to midnight.

Choson Exchange chimed in with additional information:

[Hwanggumbol Trading Corporation] managers have taken part in multiple CE workshops and have taken part in mind-mapping and team-building exercises, as well as lean startup methodology and customer needs strategies. It is fitting that the article speaks of “responding to people’s demands”, though it is then said that “the idea of loving people”, rather than “responding to their demands” is the concept they use. Its gratifying to see that some of the concepts we’ve covered in workshops are packed up in PR-conscious statements like these.

On a Women in Business workshop in Singapore last year, the businesswomen were obsessed with how retail worked elsewhere – Geoffrey recounts here how it took ages to drag them through a mall, not because they were shopping, but because they were taking notes on everything. They were extremely curious about how customers could be attracted, engaged and kept.

Back in Pyongyang, the manager of Hwanggumbol, Mr. Ryang Sung Jin, mentions that they are “prioritizing benefits for the people and their business’ goal is people’s convenience”. Clearly, these guys have found their angle, differentiating themselves quite dramatically from the competition.

NK News did a follow-up as well that was re-posted to The Guardian. The article translated much of the Choson Sinbo material that is behind a registration-wall:

The stores are located in residential streets to let the people buy groceries at their convenience. To guarantee low prices, Hwanggumbol Trading Corporation practices bulk purchasing from various producers around the country and consistently accelerates circulation of purchases and sales, it said. According to the article, some of its imported goods also enjoy tariff benefits.

However, the store’s management has kept its distance from capitalist principles, describing its operation as the “realisation of the Party’s love for the people,” drawing a line between its own interests and those of capitalist corporations.

“To put people’s interest above anything and to serve the people’s convenience are the aims of our service,” Ryang Sung-jin, the president of Hwanggumbol Trading Corporation, was quoted as saying.

Hwanggumbol Store currently runs three stores in Pyongyang and plans to expand its number of stores to 20 by spring 2015. The stores are also expanding their range of services and will be providing door-to-door delivery and sales, as well as ticketing reservations for trains and planes, the report said.

“We also know of people trying to start a chain of stores as well as dry-cleaning and delivery services in Pyongyang,” Abrahamian said. “There is definitely a generation of business people thinking creatively, asking ‘why not?’ when it comes to new ways of doing things.”

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Pyongyang’s official haircut prices

Sunday, January 11th, 2015

A friend passes along some pictures (taken in 2014) of Pyongyang haircuts and prices.

Men:

2014-mens-hair-prices-1 2014-mens-hair-prices-2

Here is what the chart says:

Haircut for Men Price Table
Approval “No.4540″ on November 11, 2011, by the National Pricing Bureau (State Price Commission)

Cut (long hair)–25 won
*Vigor style cut–50 won
Dry–10 won
Shaving–10 won
Self-shaving–5 won
Curling hair with heated tongs–15 won
Dyeing–50 won

*The “Vigor Style cut (Pae-Ki Mo-Ri)” resembles Kim Jong-un’s hair style

Women:

2014-women-haircut-chart-1 2014-women-haircut-chart-2

Here is what the chart says:

Haircut for Women Price Table
Approval “No.4540″ on November 11, 2010, by the National Pricing Bureau (State Price Commission)

Permanent (long hair)–100 won
Permanent (short hair)–70 won
Permanent (bangs)–45 won
Hair cut–20 won
Hair cut, Permanent, Hair cut, Dry–110 won
Set (long hair)–30 won
Set (short hair)–20 won
Dry–20 won
Brush (long hair)–20 won
Brush (short hair)–20 won

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Friday fun: You had one job

Friday, October 24th, 2014

What better way to commemorate the birthday of leader Kim Jong-il:

FridayFun

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Kwangbok Department Store rebate promotion

Wednesday, December 5th, 2012

A visitor to the DPRK  sent in the picture below.  The photo was taken inside the Kwangbok Area Supermarket, and it gives the impression that the institution is aggressively seeking to earn a profit. How many other socialist department stores are offering temporary rebates?

Here is a translation of the sign:

알 림
Notice

우대표 발급 : (기간 : 4.15 – 4.29)
Preferential issuance : (Date: 4.15 – 4.29)

10만원이상 상품을 산 경우 5000원 (우대표)
Buy more than 100,000 KPW and get 5,000 KPW (preferential coupon)

20만원이상 상품을 산 경우 10000원 (우대표)
Buy more than 200,000 KPW and get 10,000 KPW (preferential coupon)

20만원이상 상품을 산 경우 식당에서 음식물의 총 가격의 10%를 무료봉사
If you buy more than 200,000 KPW you get 10% free service of the total at the food restaurant

100만원이상 상품을 산 경우 식당에서 영구적인 우대봉사 받을 수 있는 카드 1장과 10000원 우대표
If you buy more than 1,000,000 KPW you can get one lifetime preferential service coupon and 10,000 KPW (preferential coupon)

※ 우대표는 4.29일까지 사용할 수 있음.
※ Preferential coupon can be used until April 29

Learn more about the very interesting Kwangbok Area Supermarket here.

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North Korea preparing advertising law

Thursday, November 22nd, 2012

Institute for Far Eastern Studies (IFES)
2012-11-22

In North Korea, a common metaphor for advertising is “flower of capitalism.” However, in the latest newspaper of Kim Il Sung University, an article stressing the need for advertisement law was published, suggesting a growing interest in commercial advertisement.

In the July issue of Kim Il Sung University newspaper (vol. 3, 2012), an article titled, “Basic Principles for Export Advertising,” argued that advertising activities are necessary to improve export growth and national leadership in the international community, and hence, an appropriate advertising act must be enacted.

It added, advertisement law must be enacted based on thorough examination to prevent capitalist elements from seeping in, and it should be pursed in the direction of promoting national economy and improve material and cultural lives of the people.

The newspaper also explained that the act should explicate the rights and responsibilities of the parties involved, sanctions for breach of law, and specify places for advertisements and target groups.

The role of state apparatus for advertisement was also mentioned: to monitor, control, and grant rights for advertising activities of businesses, as well as screen and provide registration of advertisements.

Also, sincerity, creativity, and artistry were named as important elements for effective advertisement to provide sufficient product information and attract consumer interest and motivate consumers to make purchases.

Kim Il Sung University is the first national and most prestigious university in North Korea. The position of the school also represents the interests of the North Korean government. Thus, it is likely that North Korean authorities are actively preparing laws and state organizations for advertisement.

Up to now, North Korea has established regulations for advertising in its acts for special economic zones, including Mount Kumgang Tourist resort, Kaesong Industrial Complex, and Rason Special Economic Zone, to attract foreign investments. However, this will be the first law dealing solely with advertising and advertisements.

Except for a small box-form of advertising appearing in the Pyongyang Times, there is no commercial advertising in North Korean media, including Korean Central Television, Rodong Sinmun, and the Korean Central News Agency.

Given the recent changes, the new Kim Jong Un regime is likely taking interest in commercial advertising to promote production of export items and advance into overseas markets.

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Friday Fun: The DPRK’s anti-trauma toothpaste

Friday, September 7th, 2012

A reader sends in the marketing material for a new toothpaste on offer in the DPRK:

According to the label this toothpaste is quite innovative:

“Super herb-made toothpaste”

“In a minuite you feel its efficacy as at medicine.”

“It removes saburra, disease germ, tartar (?) and bad smell”

“96.5% effective at removing bad breath”

“Not only riggs´ disease but also traumatic treatment”

Feeling traumatized? Reach for this toothpaste!

If anyone can determine the active ingredient or name of the manufacturing company/factory on the label, please let me know.

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Consumer culture changing DPRK

Wednesday, May 30th, 2012

Arirang News has posted a video on the changes in consumer culture in the DPRK. It highlights just how much things have changed since the days of Kim Il-sung:

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DPRK economic publication calls for more advertising

Friday, February 3rd, 2012

According to Yonhap:

A North Korean economic quarterly has stressed the importance of commercials to help promote the country’s exports, which rely heavily on China.

“We should promote our economic prowess abroad and decisively increase exports of products by taking advantage of commercials in foreign trade,” North Korean quarterly magazine, Economic Research, reported in its October edition, a copy of which was obtained by Yonhap News Agency.

The publication, which mostly deals with the North’s economic policies, said exports should contribute to achieving the country’s stated goal of ushering in a prosperous nation by this year.

The year 2012 has political significance to North Korea as it marks the centennial of the birth of the country’s founder Kim Il-sung, grandfather of current leader Kim Jong-un.

The quarterly also called for high quality commercials to penetrate capitalist markets and increase exports of its products.

The North’s move came more than two years after an earlier short-lived experiment with commercial advertising.

In July 2009, the North’s television aired commercials that showed young women in traditional clothes serving frothy mugs of Taedonggang beer, billed as the “Pride of Pyongyang.”

Other products, including ginseng and quail, soon appeared in television advertisements, fueling speculation the isolated country may start to embrace a capitalist mode of life.

However, the commercials disappeared a month later when then-leader Kim Jong-il sacked his television point man in anger over what he described as aping China’s early reforms.

China has repeatedly pressed the North to follow in its footsteps in embracing reform similar to that which lifted millions of Chinese out of poverty and helped Beijing’s rise to become the world’s second-largest economy.

Additional Information:

1. Here is a link to the infamous Taedonggang Beer Commercial and a longer ten-minute infomercial. Here is the ginseng advert. Here is the quail advert. Yonhap reported that Kim Jong-il was unhappy with these ads.

2. The only commercial billboards that appear in Pyongyang are those for the Phyonghwa Motors vehicles produced domestically by a joint venture deal with the Unification Church.  See one of these billboards here.

3. There is apparently a Korea Advertising Company.

Read the full story here:
N. Korea calls for high quality commercials to boost exports
Yonhap
2012-2-3

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Jesus at Mangyongdae

Tuesday, January 19th, 2010

A reader sent in this photo of a North Korean girl visiting Mangyongdae in Pyongyang:

dprk-jesus-2.jpg
Click image for larger version

This shirt obviously originated in China and was purchased in a local market. The “Chinglish” reads: “I Love Jesus” and “Tinkerbell, Trust and Pixie Dust”.

Follow-up: I allowed RFA to use this image, but it has shown up elsewhere along with quotes attributed to me that I never made.  The Korea Times story is the only one that I can read, but I never spoke to them about this picture.  Here are all the media stories that I am aware of:  Korea Times, Yonhap,  Choson Ilbo, RFA.

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No more beer commercials!

Monday, November 9th, 2009

Apparently Kim Jong il is growing intolerant of North Korean television advertising anything other than how great he and his father are.  According to Yonhap:

“Recently, Kim saw the commercials while watching TV. He was enraged, asking where the commercials came from and describing them as the prototype of China’s early reforms,” one source said.

Starting July 2, North Korea’s television played commercials that showed young women in traditional clothes serving frothy mugs of Taedonggang beer billed as “Pride of Pyongyang.”

Other products, including ginseng and quail, soon followed in television advertisements, which had rarely been seen in the country, generating outside speculation that North Korea may be starting to embrace the capitalist mode of life.

But according to Yonhap News Agency’s own analysis, the commercials disappeared as of the end of August. The sources said Cha Sung-su, the North’s top broadcaster, has also been discharged.

One source said Cha may have been unduly victimized in the case because the commercials were a product of Kim’s earlier instruction to create “more interesting and diverse” television programs.

Cha, 69, is one of Kim’s closest aides, having accompanied him on public inspections at least six times since the leader reportedly had a stroke last year and then recovered.

He is the North’s top television man, having served on the communist country’s broadcasting committee for about four decades. He is also known in North Korea for his numerous poems.

I previously blogged about the beer commercials (as did most other K-bloggers) and included a link to a longer 10-minute “infomercial”.

Here is the actual commercial courtesy of the BBC. Here is the commercial on YouTube (without commercial interruption).

Here is the ginseng commercial (Koryo Insam).

Here is the quail restaurant commercial.

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