North Korea seeks investments from overseas Koreans

Institute for Far Eastern Studies (IFES)
2014-3-7

North Korea has been showing increased efforts in attracting economic investment from overseas Koreans. In particular, recent foreign media outlets run by overseas Koreans are showing increased emphasis on economic cooperation with North Korea.

In the March issue of the monthly magazine Joguk (Homeland) published by the General Association of Korean Residents in Japan (a pro-North Korea association), featured an interview with Park Kyung Jin, the director of Economic Cooperation Office for Overseas Koreans.

In the interview, Director Park described the plans for the organization: “We are diligently working to create an environment where overseas Koreans can successfully do business with North Korea.” He also emphasized that they are continually working to protect the rights and provide special legal treatment for overseas Koreans.

On February 24, US-based pro-North Korean website Minjoktongsin (Minjok Thongsin) introduced Kim Ji Hyuk and Ri Hak Song, department heads of the (DPRK) State Economic Development Commission in an article, “Where Is the North Korean Economy Heading?”

In the article, the officials stressed that North Korea is actively looking to foster economic experts and said, “We welcome the participation of experts, businesses, and organizations of overseas Koreans who wish to invest in North Korea.”

In addition, in order to increase economic cooperation with overseas Koreans, the commission introduced future plans of easing the travel process to and from North Korea including visa and other entry requirements.

North Korea is subject to international sanctions that limit its trade with most of the world and appears to be turning to overseas Koreans to overcome the country’s economic crisis. Rather than reaching out to other foreigners, North Korea is likely to be reaching out to overseas Koreans who share a common language and ethnicity, with relatively easier access.

Since the establishment of the Joint Venture Act in 1984, North Korea has worked extensively with the General Association of Korean Residents in Japan and with ethnic Koreans living in China. Since the launch of the Kim Jong Un regime, economic development zones (EDZs) are being set up across the country and ties with overseas Koreans are likely to be strengthened in efforts to further attract foreign investments into North Korea.

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