South Korea asks for immunity for officials stationed in Kaesong

Benjamin Katzeff Silberstein

While the world gears up for the summit (yes, The Summit), things are moving along on the peninsula as well. Moon promised in the election campaign that he would not only re-open Kaesong, but work to enlarge the zone as well. Last week, South Korea asked that North Korea grant diplomatic immunity for the officials it plans to station in the liaison office the two countries are in the process of establishing in the city:

The two Koreas agreed last week to open a liaison office in the city “at an early date” at high-level talks to discuss steps for implementing promises made by their leaders in the historic April and May summits.

South Korea plans to station its officials there in order to keep communication channels open around the clock as part of efforts to support cross-border exchanges, which are likely to increase.

According to the sources close to the matter, South Korea’s government recently proposed the North grant immunity from arrest and detention for its officials to be stationed in the office, just as the Vienna Convention grants such privilege to diplomats.

In addition, it also proposed that the North guarantee safety of passage and communications for its officials, while exempting them from checks on their bags and pouches, the sources said.

Kaesong is the western border city in the North where the two Koreas operated a joint industrial complex since 2004. It was hailed as a successful example of economic cooperation between the two Koreas as it married South Korea’s capital with the North’s cheap and skillful labor.

South Korea, however, closed its operations there in early 2016 and brought its officials and workers back in protest at the North’s continued missile and nuclear provocations.

Though there was an agreement regarding the safety of South Korean personnel at the time, there was no clear legal ground for the South Korean government to ask for the return of its people in case of their arrest or detention, experts said.

Article source:
S. Korea asks N. Korea to grant immunity to officials at liaison office to open in North
Yonhap News
2018-06-05

It wouldn’t be surprising if moves to open Kaesong come relatively soon, pending the overall diplomatic situation and sanctions regime. Kim Jong-un’s predilection for SEZs is well known and natural, they bring opportunities for making hard currency for the state while keeping systemic changes and capitalist incursion (in the North Korean lingo) contained within a specific geographic area. Some hope that they will eventually bring systemic changes to the broader North Korean society as well, but with Kaesong, we’ve seen no evidence that that is the case.

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An affiliate of 38 North