Chollima Leadership Program announced…

This new program, co-sponsored by LiNK and the International Republican Institute (IRI), seeks to invest North Korea’s future by teaching former North Korean citizens  leadership and organizational skills so they may bring benefits to the DPRK when the doors are opened.

Fifteen candidates of different ages, genders, and experiences will be selected on the basis of their potential to benefit from the program.

The three week program will be hosted in Seoul where workshops will be conducted by experts and trainers from various countries and backgrounds.  Topics to be covered include: democracy and governance, rule of law, international human rights, comparative movements, comparative politics, business protocol and etiquette, and leadership development.

All applications must be submitted with all components completed by March 31, 2008. If you feel you, or others you know, would be a good candidate for the Chollima Leadership Program, please contact jane (at) linkglobal.org for more information and an application.

Here is a summary on the IRI web page.

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  • This is a very sensible project. According to Dr. Lankov, things in N.Korea can change only as the result of a revolution:

    See http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/8de42f08-f942-11dc-bcf3-000077b07658.html

    “However, pressure and isolation will not work either. The US cannot “isolate” the North. China, South Korea and perhaps even Russia, driven by their own priorities, will continue to provide at least some aid, helping to keep the regime afloat. The only real hope is in the form of transformation from below – a revolution.

    It will happen, sooner or later, but there are two strategies to speed up the event which should be used simultaneously. First, one should try to provide North Koreans with information about the outside world. The continuous support for radio broadcasts and to fund opposition activities is vital.

    Second, there is another strategy to foment dissent – the development of officially approved exchanges, such as visits by academics, hosting concerts and exhibitions. Since such measures require Pyongyang’s consent, they would be impossible to arrange without some compromises…”

    Certainly, a new type of leaders familiar with both the modern politics and N.Korea’s domestic situation will be needed.

    LP


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