EDZs to be set up in northern area

According to the Pyongyang Times (2014-4-26):

Amid steady efforts to establish and develop unique economic zones in line with the specific conditions of each province, two economic zones are in the making in the border area in Jagang Province.

The province in the northwestern part of the country adjoins China with the Amnok River in between.

The Jagang Provincial People’s Committee is planning to set up an economic development zone in Manpho City and an industrial development zone in Wiwon County by taking advantage of the favourable geographical environment and exploitable resources.

Manpho is opposite Jilin Province of China over the Amnok.

It is blessed with cultural relics.

In Segom-dong there are the site of Segom Pavilion, Mangmi Pavilion built in 1436 and a 1 200-metre-long stone wall around the town of Manpho.

The site of Segom Pavilion is on the natural rock on the cliff, 100 metres above the water surface of the Amnok and facing the river. The pavilion was built during the feudal Joson dynasty (1392-1910) and burnt down by the Japanese imperialists in 1938 before Korea’s liberation. As the place commands a marvellous view it has been known as one of eight scenic spots in the northwestern region of Korea since olden times.

There are Kosanjin Fort and a group of graves in Kyongsong Valley, which were built during the feudal Joson dynasty, in Kosan-ri, menhirs from the period of Koryo (918-1392) in Mitha-ri and stone graves in Munak-dong.

There are mineral springs good for the treatment of various diseases including gastric disorders in Yonha- and Mitha-ri.

The Manpho Economic Development Zone covers an area of about 3 square kilometres embracing parts of Mitha-ri (Poltung Islet in the Amnok River included) and Phosang-ri which face Jian in Tonghua of Jilin over the river.

It is 8-18 km from the DPRK-China border bridge of Manpho, 70 km from that of Wiwon, 165 km from that of Junggang and 8-18 km from the border railway station of Manpho. There are railway lines between Manpho and Pyongyang and between Manpho and Hyesan, and Jian Railway Station in Jilin on the opposite side leads to Changchun via Tonghua.

Power and water supplies are satisfactory as the zone is located 14 km from the Jangjagang Power Station with a capacity of 90 000 kW and 15 km from the Manpho Yonha Power Station with a capacity of 10 000 kW and the water source of the Amnok River is plentiful.

An international service base combining tourism and trade will be built in the Mitha-ri area comprising Poltung Islet by exploiting cultural relics and tourism resources and a modern agricultural base incorporating the food production cycle in the Phosang-ri area.

Wiwon County is opposite Northeast China over the Amnok River.

It is rich in mineral deposits including white silica.

Forests account for 87 per cent of the area of the county and so it is a leading timber production centre.

The county’s water system is comprised of the Amnok, Jangja and Wiwon rivers and Wiwon Reservoir.

The Wiwon Industrial Development Zone also covers an area of nearly 3 square kilometres encompassing the shores of the Wiwon River, a tributary of the Amnok, and Wiwon Reservoir, and parts of Togam- and Kosong-ri in the county opposite China’s Jian.

It is 20 km from the Wiwon Power Station with a capacity of 390 000 kW and 25 km from the Manpho Yonha Power Station.

In and around the zone there are metallic silicon factories that turn out ferrosilicon and other metallic silicon.

It has a favourable condition for entry and exit and transport of imports and exports as it is 20 km from the point of border transit in Wiwon, 80 km from that in Manpho and 180 km from that in Junggang.

The zone will mainly specialize in processing minerals, timber and local farm products and manufacturing machinery on the basis of rich natural resources while engaging in scientific research into sericulture and freshwater fish farming.

Plans of the development zones have already been completed and investors are making field surveys.

 

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